There’s good news for injured workers in Washington State that seek alternative treatment options for industrial injuries or occupational diseases! I previously wrote an article about the L&I pilot program enabling acupuncture treatment for injured workers . It turns out that the pilot program is near completion. Consequently, L&I adopted rules for the authorization of acupuncture to treat symptoms associated with low back pain.

 

Workers’ Compensation Claims and Acupuncture

Throughout the acupuncture pilot, L&I used information and data collected during the pilot project to draft WAC 296-23-238. Effective June 1st 2019, under WAC 296-23-238, L&I and self-insurers may pay for acupuncture to treat low back pain in workers’ compensation claims. Under this rule, the low back condition generating the pain must be an accepted condition in the claim. However, this week L&I reported that:

other conditions may be considered at a later date based on L&I’s review of available scientific and clinical evidence.

 

It is important to note that the pilot program will continue through May 31st 2019. Prior to June 1st 2019, only participants in the pilot program can use acupuncture to treat injured workers for work injuries. Beginning June 1st 2019, other non-pilot L&I providers that have a license to provide acupuncture treatment may begin using acupuncture to treat injured workers. Any providers who are new to treating injured workers will need to apply for an L&I provider number. Once an L&I provider number is obtained, L&I can release payments for acupuncture providers that treat injured workers.

 

Workers’ comp claim conditions for treatment

On top, there are several other important facts to remember regarding acupuncture treatment. For example, L&I allows up to a maximum of 10 acupuncture treatments over the course of the lifetime of a claim to treat low back pain associated with a casually related condition. In order for L&I to cover the treatment, the claim file must include documentation for the referral from the attending provider. On top, the treatment provided must be only for covered conditions, and the claim must be allowed and open. Furthermore, the treatment provider must submit validated functional instruments to track and document the treatment progress for the initial, middle and final treatment sessions. Validated functional instruments include the “2-item Graded Chronic Pain Scale” and the “Oswestry Disability Index”.

 

Acupuncture treatment isn’t for everyone. There are a variety of valid reasons injured workers may decline to consider acupuncture as a treatment option. When it comes to invasive procedures like the use of needles, injured workers always have the right to decide if they are willing to undergo the proposed treatment. However, for individuals who might like to explore alternative treatment options, especially for chronic pain, it is nice that L&I decided to extend coverage for this kind of treatment. More information can be found on the L&I website.